The River Thames Meets C G Jung

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This photograph was taken on the south side of the river Thames at Greenwich. When it rains, London’s Victorian sewage system floods into the river, sewage ‘n all. The rivers tide will take the raw sewage out to sea eventually, it usually takes around three weeks.

The changing climate means London has received it’s fair share of rain and the EU directive on cleaning our rivers has seen the building of a new mega-structure, deep below ground. The Thames Tunnel, built along side the river Thames will carry London’s overflow, not into the river, instead it will travel to a water treatment plant where the water will be cleaned. The sandy beaches of the river Thames will see people paddling in the water without the danger of disease. Thames water have already said there will be an increase in water bills to help pay for the tunnel. Thanks to Margaret Thatcher, almost 20% of Thames Water is owned by foreign investment as well as an array of pension funds from across the globe, including British Telecom. Every time a Londoner now turns on the tap, those baby boomers who lunch will have another round of golf on a glass of water which is supposed to be a human right.

p20141205-202020 wThis picture was taken from under the river Thames. We stand in a Victorian tunnel that once transported people from Greenwich in south-east London to Millwall on the Isle of dogs (docklands), on the east side. My paternal great, great grand-father spent his working life in the docks as a tea blender while my maternal grand father spent his time there supporting Millwall football club. The shadow lurking behind is the shadow, according to Jung, that we all possess. The unacknowledged darkness will eventually project it’s way into our society, usually through violence and man’s inhumanity to man. London in 2015 is not the London I grew with as a child. Homelessness makes me feel powerless and I’ve noticed the rich, privileged and grammar school educated get the best jobs and the divide between the rich and the poor appears to be widening.

Canary Dwarf

Grove Street, SE8

This is where my photography journey began. My dad belonged to the team of professionals who regenerated Deptford in the early 1990’s. It’s his photo really because he was the one who encouraged me to climb to the top of one of Deptford’s many high rises. With my hard hat in tow and the wind blowing vigourously in my face we both climbed in the builders lift together.

My photography tutor at Goldsmiths College introduced me to the term ‘thatcher’s needle’. It was an appropriate term, seen as my dad was a socialist and I can proudly say we had a picture of Lenin in the hallway of our family home in Forest Hill.

Little did I know this would be the last home he lived in (depicted in the far right cluster of homes, ironically). He died in Kenya on Sunday 17th November 2013 and this photo is in his memory. This is when he was the dad I loved and cherished and before the life he chose, that broke him.