Bumble Bees Bumbling

This was one of those hair raising moments that could quite easily replace retail therapy. I could have quite happily followed that bumble bee all day, all week even. It was a moment where nothing else mattered, the world was at peace with itself and bees will live forever.

As it flew away I felt abandoned, I wanted to scream “come back here”. But I didn’t for fear of looking crazed. It had gone, forever and I was left with a nice piece of cinematography that I will cherish forever and ever.

The reality is, humanity is not at peace with itself and bees existence is very much in danger. For a moment in time the bee which I am forever grateful to, fed my inner world, my existence was meaningful with purpose. I didn’t need to suffice my inner desires with consumption, nature did it for me, the best therapeutic moment I’d had in ages and I didn’t need to spend a penny. Possessions please, the poppy was my possession, I’d grown it in my garden. I’d planted the seeds, watered them and watched them grow. I didn’t need retail therapy because I was feeding my soul with the buzz of a bumble bee.

Ecotherapy

p20140429-180557When I joined the University of East Anglia, on a master of science in international development and water security, I had left behind me, three years of studying to become a psychotherapist. My psychological interest in the earth, led me there. I wanted to understand humans geopolitical and economic relationship with our planet. After a year of studying, my mind felt more confused and left university not really knowing how I could apply all the knowledge I had gained.

The one certainty I left with was the integral relationship between our psyche and capitalism and the environment and our economy. Ecotherapy is a tool that has the potential to develop a new relationship which can bring together our psyche and our environment and reject aspects of capitalism and the economy. I am not an anti-capitalist, I do however take a political ecology approach to the environment and believe there are many unnecessary inequalities that exist globally. These inequalities need to be acknowledged and understood if we are to resolve the issue of climate change. A political ecologist will question everything and believe nothing. For example, I recently highlighted on Twitter the relationship between the luxury leather business and deforestation in the Amazon. Greenpeace ensured me they were happy to speak about their climate and agriculture campaigns and confirmed they receive no corporate donations. Another contentious issue is the chocolate industry and the inequality between the amount of money made by the farmers and the amount made by those who import the chocolate into the West. I will explore this further in another post. I am sickened by the divide between the rich and the poor. I am neither rich nor poor, just a humble individual trying to preserve this planet for my grand-children and their children.

I graduated in 2013, since then I have been attempting to reconnect with my earth. I have been a conscientious consumer, purchasing second hand where I can. I’ve thought about the chemicals I use to clean with and I have attempted to not pollute my waste water. I have an allotment which is rich in alluvial soil, here I grow my own vegetables and fruit. I make my own aromatherapy products too which has given me a great sense of connection to my ancient past.

For me, ecotherapy is about discovering aspects of our self through our connection with our natural environment. Trees and their roots, fungi, grass, mountain ranges, plants, flowers, bees, they can all help us to find our self in a chaotic world that sometimes, we have no control over. Being in an ancient forest gives me a space to feel at home in when I am feeling unloved in the world. Stay with me on this journey. I’m not here to make money, just share my experiences of the natural world, my inner self and how I understand the chaotic world we live in.

 

 

 

Collecting Pollen

beethistlebig

My husband, daughter and me found an ants nest when we visited Bedgebury National Pinetum and Forest, as well as an array of Buddleia’s alive with butterflies. Four out of five children now suffer with nature deficit disorder.

Managing my 14 year olds sons connection with nature was much easier when he was younger. Now he likes to be with his friends more than he likes to be with me.  We are lucky that we have a forest at the end of our garden which he does frequent. He hasn’t been out of the house for a while because no one likes the cold, only when there’s a blanket of snow. I advised to him to go climb a tree, something he’s awesome at. I’ve yet to meet someone who can climb a tree as well as he can.

Bumble Bee and Thistle

Bumble Bee and Thistle

I took this on the disused railway of mid Norfolk, near a hamlet called Worthing, where I once lived. Set in the middle of an agricultural farm we was truly connected to nature. The river Wensum flowed across the field from where we lived and the fields hosted an array of crops from sugar beat, wheat, corn and rapeseed. Owls regularly visited our garden and we spent many evenings watching the bats as they swooped around the garden catching bugs, grubs and anything else they could find.

We could hear beyond the milkyway and see the silence of the forest as it shrouded us with a great sense of peace and tranquillity. It is a fondness I will cherish forever and I hope I eased my children’s inner selves with a connection to nature that will always sit deep within them, nurturing their unconscious.